Dominican Day 4

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HAAAAAY it’s yo girls Korica and Maura all the way from the DR!!! We had an adventurous day chilling at the orphanage, falling off fabric swings, bargaining at the market, eating pounds of Chinese food, and having dance parties on our bus through Santo Domingo. We also got to eat cake and other goodies from a local Dominican shop. We’re starting to really build relationships with the people in the community, and it’s been so awesome getting to know them and loving on them this week. We’re so pumped to head to the 27 waterfalls tomorrow and bring 3 girls from the orphanage with us. We also can’t believe that we’re more than halfway done with our trip.

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Hola Amigos/Amigas!  Its Lauren (the young one).  I still haven’t caught on to Spanish or these cold showers but its’s still in the process! Today, Joe bought a couple of dolls the girls made at the orphanage, Britt and myself got to cook some good DR food for the feeding program, Maura somehow fit 3 people in one ENO hammock, and Callie did some hard core bargaining at the market! We’re learning more and more from the kiddos and growing closer as a group everyday (haven’t laughed this hard in my life) Tomorrow we are headed to the 27 waterfalls for an adventure!
 
XOXO, DR Squad
 
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Dominican Day 4

Dominican Day 1

Hey! This is Korica and I’m a participant on this trip. Today was an eventful and fulfilling day. We started our day off with our first Dominican breakfast. The food here has been nothing short of amazing. I don’t think any of us were expecting such delicious food especially some of us picky eaters. The first kid we got to meet was Volie who actually lives right below our host family-Carie and Rick. She was super excited to meet us and just play with us, which automatically made us even more excited to just be there in her presence. Later that day, we went to pick out some flowers and four people got the chance to ride on the back of a motorcycle! We then had lunch and went out to the park to pull weeds and paint the area. The kids were so enthusiastic about us being there and helped out with the painting. All of us put in so much work to make the park nice and pretty for the community. It was such a rewarding experience for all of us to see the community getting involved and to give back to them because they really did appreciate it. After we were done, we got to dance with the kids and play soccer.
HI, this is Maura and I’m also a participant!!! What a amazing trip this has already been! We left at 2 am on Friday night (or I guess Saturday morning) and after a basically sleepless night we landed in the Dominican Saturday afternoon. We met our host dad, Rick at the airport and rode in a bus along the beach to our home for the week. This morning, after a lot of confusion with the time changes, Callie (our site leader) woke us up an hour early for breakfast (awkward…). It ended up being an awesome morning because we went exploring in the backyard of their property and met the kids that live downstairs (as well as a super cute puppy). Today was an awesome day of working hard on the park and playing with the kids. We had so much fun with the kids playing games, running around, playing soccer, and laughing. The community here is so beautiful. Although the language barrier can be frustrating at times, it’s so fulfilling to just spend time with the people and love on them using smiles, laughs, sound effects, and hugs. The park is a project that Auburn started a couple years ago, and it’s so awesome how the community here gathers to spend time together there. Tomorrow, we are headed to the orphanage, medical clinic, and to help out with the feeding program our host family started. We’re so excited for the rest of this week! Sending love from the DR!
XOXO, DR squad
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Dominican Day 1

Definitely can’t be the same

DAY 6 – Dominican Republic

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            Our last full day here 😦  although we were all sad that our trip is coming to a close, we still had a great time at the 27 waterfalls attraction. After a 45 minute hike, we each proceeded to slide and jump down each of 27 natural waterfalls, spitting icy cold water. Good thing our showers helped up build up a bit of a tolerance…we were able to numb up fairly quickly and enjoy the beautiful coves all afternoon! A good way to end a week of hard work. We will all be happy to be home; however, as I said before, leaving is definitely bittersweet. However, I know that each person on this trip took much more out of these experiences than they even thought possible, and we will sincerely cherish these memories for the rest of our lives.

Definitely can’t be the same

Seriously disturbed….in a good way

DAY 5 – Dominican Republic

This morning we returned to the orphanage, got a lot of painting done, and gave the girls a brand new rose colored room with hot pink dressers. After saying our last goodbyes, we returned to the house, ate lunch, and packed up the hygiene packets we assembled for patients at the local hospital. Each packet contained a variety of soaps, hotel shampoos, toothbrushes, etc…a special treat for the patients, seeing as the hospital is only obligated to provide them with a bed and an IV.

The hospital visit truly was mentally draining for many of us. The atmosphere was unlike any hospital I have ever entered. Honestly, the humane shelter in my home town seems more luxurious than the patients’ rooms we entered; and I don’t mean for that comparison to sound facetious…unfortunately, the conditions there were truly unreal. Upon our arrival, the boys and girls were separated, due to the fact that no males, even family, are allowed in the maternity ward. Thus, I am unable to attest for what the boys saw, but from what they say many of the injuries and treatment methods they encountered were fairly hard to stomach. They described devices made of string and milk jugs being used to support broken limbs until patients could afford more advanced healing accommodations.

We girls, however, remained in the maternity area throughout our entire visit, distributing the hygiene packets and snapping Polaroid pictures of the newborns for their mothers. It truly was a blessing being able to encourage the mothers and offer them a nice treat for the day. After making our rounds through the nursing rooms, Carie turned to me, knowing I am a pre-med student, and asked if I would be willing to accompany her into the neonatal unit to take pictures of the babies. As heartbreaking as it is to say this, I honestly felt as if I was possibly taking the last photographs of these babies’ lives…I tried my hardest to find a good angle with the polaroid, as ridiculous as that sounds, because I figured that one instant-print photograph could possibly be the last tangible memory a mother will have of her child. The babies were so tiny, so helpless…and the final picture I took was of the smallest one, probably seven inches from head to toes, inside an incubator located at the front of the room. A true fighter. I have never seen anything like it. At that very moment I couldn’t help but think of Santo…almost equally as weak and helpless, yet hopeful and thankful just to be alive. It was, to say the very, very least, a humbling experience I will never forget.

After the hospital, we returned to the house and finished painting the Bernard’s’ fence…and each other. I think the dog even got paint on itself at one point. Ultimately, it was nice being able to do something for Rick and Carie…they have been beyond wonderful hosts, and it was the least we could do to reciprocate all of their help.

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Seriously disturbed….in a good way

Shaken by pure joy

DAY 4 – Dominican Republic

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            We began the morning with pancakes, which obviously meant it was going to be a good day. On our way to the orphanage we stopped and visited an elderly friend of Rick and Carie’s named Santo. At the age of 15, Santo fractured some section of his spine when falling from a tree and has been a completely immobile paraplegic for over 55 years. Before we left, Carie described Santo as one of the most joyful people she knows…one of those people whose spirit is so contagious you can’t help but feel it to at least some extent. The minute we stepped into Santo’s room I completely understood what she meant. Lying in front of me was a bed ridden man, maybe 50 pounds, complete skin and bones, literally a walking skeleton…yet for some reason I found myself grinning from ear to ear as he welcomed our group so warmly, excited just to have guests for a few minutes. I still cannot wrap my head around the miracle of his condition…it truly is a medical marvel that this man has lived to see over 70 years of age. However, his survival is no longer a physical matter, but it is one reliant upon a seemingly invincible hope. There is no doubt in my mind that Santo’s hope helps keep him alive, and Rick and Carie’s work has definitely played a prime role in his determination.

Once we arrived at the orphanage I saw a few children I recognized, and they recognized me as well. Many of us also bought “expression dolls” made by the girls for monetary profit. We then took five girls with us to the local beach, which was an extremely special treat for them, seeing as they probably have only been there once or twice, despite the fact that the beach is only 30 minutes away from the orphanage. After we dropped them back off, we returned to the house and began to paint the fence out front…at least until we ran out of paint. Regardless, we all still had a great time being outside together all day…it’s awesome to see how close we’ve all become in just a few days, especially considering how awkward our first meetings were back in Auburn. Wow…back in Auburn…that was honestly a little weird to say. I haven’t even thought of that place much recently. We only have a couple of days left here, and I will be happy to be home, however departure truly is bittersweet.

Shaken by pure joy

Reality check

DAY 2 – Dominican Republic

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            This morning we visited a girls’ orphanage sponsored by the Bernards. The children’s’ stories are dumbfounding. One little girl, I think about the age of 4, continued to hang around me for a good part of the morning. I could sense her sweet spirit…she had intelligent eyes, and although she never said a word, she didn’t come off as shy at all. I honestly didn’t even notice she wasn’t talking until Carie approached me, saying that the girl was completely unable to talk. Later tonight she shared with me the little girl’s story: her parents were both witch doctors who were murdered because of their practices, and although she is physically able to speak, she has, as the people here say, a spirit hanging over her, preventing her from speaking. Carie told me she has been trying to enroll the girl in a school for deaf students, seeing as she currently has no schooling whatsoever; however such establishments refuse to accept her because she technically is neither deaf nor mute. Carie says she’s heard her make a moaning sound once, but that’s it. Every girl in the orphanage has some sort of story, and most all of them have gone through more in their short lives than I probably ever will in mine.

The orphanage itself was simple; it even had goats in the backyard along with a single swing set and trampoline. It was truly refreshing to see children playing with one another outside rather than being glued to a TV screen all day. They were all so happy with each other, and even the smallest things brought them joy. My Spanish is terrible and they still stuck to me like flies…I’m not one to be all over all the kids all of the time, it’s not something that comes as naturally to me, but the look in their eyes today will never leave my memory. That’s a reward in itself.

After lunch we rode the bus to an area the family calls the “refugee camp,” which is really a slum housing victims of Hurricane George. I honestly cannot begin to describe the living conditions I saw. Literally shacks. Just like the places I see in documentaries and movies…but in reality, it’s so much more impactful. I didn’t necessarily feel sympathy or guilt, maybe because it was too surreal, but I tried to take it all in and observe as much as possible. However, all I did was take a short walk…all I’m participating in now is a short week of service. I’ll never even begin to wrap my mind around those peoples’ lives. Can they have any hopes or dreams? It seems their only objective in life is survival. I’ve always had my entire world handed to me on a platter, full of opportunity and promise. I feel like I’ve already taken more out of this trip in two days than I would from the entire week. And for that, I am truly, truly grateful.

After walking through the refugee area, we proceeded to set up four folding tables in the middle of the street and unload our medical supplies. The most advanced treatments we had were antibiotics, and most of us were primarily in charge of distributing gummy vitamins, hydrocortisone cream, and other OTC drugs as if we were trained to do so. Mothers were bringing their sick children to us, waiting for a diagnosis and treatment that could be picked up in a local CVS. But to them this was care, which really got me thinking. Medical care in these places isn’t even an economical issue. It’s a means for survival. Honestly, a means for hope. I believe we all did our best today, and I know the experience touched the hearts and minds of each person in our group.

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Reality check